Watercolor Techniques

Frederick Wong

Frederick Wong, Reflections, 2015, Watercolor, 21 x 24 inches.

Class Description

“My watercolor class is primarily a learning process in which one develops a familiarity with a difficult medium. As part of this learning process I ask that students not do any preliminary drawing of the subject matter—the human figure—and then fill it in between the lines. Instead, I advocate a direct attack using a large brush loaded with the wash medium.” This class works from the nude model, with a variety of short poses. Any landscape work must be done from photo reference material provided by the student.

About the Instructor

Frederick Wong received both his B.F.A. and M.A. from the University of New Mexico on a Scholastic Magazine scholarship. His primary interest lies in watercolor painting.

Mr. Wong has taught at Pratt Institute and Hofstra University. He is the author of The Complete Calligrapher and of Oriental Watercolor Techniques: For Contemporary Painting, both published by Watson-Guptill, New York. He is a member of the American Watercolor Society and Allied Artists of America.

Mr. Wong has had five one-man shows at the Mi Chou Gallery in New York City. This gallery has introduced many famous Chinese artists to the New York public, including the great master Chi Pai Shih. Mr. Wong has also exhibited at Fairleigh Dickinson University; Lehigh University; Kenmore Galleries, Philadelphia; the Katonah Gallery, Katonah, New York; Société Générale at the Landmark Gloucester Tower, Hong Kong; the Genkan Gallery; and the Tokyo-American Club, Japan.

His many awards include Gold Medals at the National Arts Club in 1961, and at the Ligonier Arts Festival in 1965 and 1967; a Gold Medal in Artists in Action, Hawaii, 1960; a Bronze Medal at the Butler Institute of American Art, 1960; and five awards from the American Watercolor Society, the most recent being the 2013 Gold Medal of Honor bestowed at the 146th Annual International Exhibition. He is represented in numerous corporate and private collections and has conducted many watercolor workshops, both domestically and internationally.

Arts Magazine noted: “What is international and timeless in landscape scenes? Well, Frederick Wong has found it in these quiet, misty scenes, suggesting at once the light and the brushwork of Gainsborough, Corot, and Monet, the philosophical overtones of Sung scrolls and wall hangings, and the almost-but-not-quite sentimentality of Robert Frost word-pictures.”

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