Drawing with Color – The Art Students League

Drawing with Color

Peter Reginato

Peter Reginato, Silver Painting #3, 2018, enamel on canvas, 72 x 58 inches

Class Description

Drawing and color will be two major elements we will deal with, along with the composition or design. Also, a very important aspect of painting is how you apply the paint. What looks convincing? How much does technique play into your image? What makes a painting attractive or appealing? Color? A strategy? Trendiness?

About the Instructor

Peter Reginato studied at the San Francisco Art Institute from 1963 to 1966. Since then he has had numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the country.

Mr. Reginato’s work is represented in many public collections, including the Allen Art Center, Houston, TX; Brown University; the Corcoran Gallery of Art; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; IBM Corporation; the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art; the Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, MA; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Mint Museum of Art; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX.

Recent solo shows include POLYCHROME at the Heidi Cho Gallery in Chelsea, NY, and Peter Reginato: Seeing Things at the Butler Institute of American Art’s Trumbull branch in Ohio. Recent group exhibitions include Five Sculptors at Able Fine Art NY Gallery (Chelsea, NY); It’s All Good!! apocalypse now at Sideshow Gallery (Williamsburg, NY); the Navy Pier Walk (Chicago, IL); and Works of the Jenny Archive at the Gagosian Gallery in NYC.

“The common wisdom in the art world today suggests that in order to make an important statement, an artist must take as much out as possible, thereby creating something that is empty. I want to do the opposite. I want to make art as full as possible. The only thing I took out of my work was realism. I saw greater possibilities in abstraction.

“I believe that a new art will contain all the traditional elements—line, form, color, composition, drawing. I want to leave behind work that is for every generation, no matter what the existing trends are, or the perceived opinion of good and bad. I would like to think that my work will be enjoyed, talked about, and maybe even seen as vital to those times; I would like to think it will mean something to whomever is looking at it.”

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